How Are We Improving Floodplain Health in the Puyallup Watershed?

We are making capital investments in integrated floodplain management and making progress toward our goals

FFTF partners meet regularly to communicate, coordinate, and resolve how to best implement their vision for integrated floodplain management in the Puyallup watershed. Implementing that vision requires financial investments and staff resources.
The following metrics help us understand our combined level of investment, its impact or outcome, and whether we are making progress toward individual partner goals for reducing flood risk, agricultural land conservation, and salmon recovery

  • Amount (dollars) of FFTF investments in integrated floodplain management
  • Number and status of floodplain restoration projects
  • Number of at-risk structures removed from flood risk
  • Amount (acres) of conserved farmland
  • Number of SCP Properties conserved
  • Number and status of WRIA 10/12 Salmon Recovery Strategy Actions

Combined contributions by FFTF Partners

How much have FFTF Partners invested in multi-benefit floodplain projects for flood risk reduction, fish and fish habitat, and agricultural viability?

FFTF Partners are working together to support the recovery of floodplain functions and protect the health and safety of communities around floodplains. They collaborate to support and fund a variety of projects to further identified goals for Puyallup watershed floodplains. Working independently and collaboratively, FFTF Partners seek and acquire funding from multiple sources including federal, state, and local grants, rate-based fees and taxes, and private foundations. Partners provide match funds in many cases and use existing grants to leverage additional funds where possible. The combined investment of all FFTF efforts is significant and will increase over time as new opportunities emerge. The combined contributions will be tracked and measured against the 2013 baseline as indication of the FFTF progress toward shared goals.

 

FFTF GOAL(S): All goals 
BASELINE YEAR: 2013 (First year of Floodplains by Design funding)
STATUS: $46,799,387 total investments in integrated floodplain management
SOURCE(S): Includes, but is not limited to:  Pierce County Planning & Public Works (PPW); Pierce County Flood Control Zone; Pierce County Real Estate Excise Tax (REET); Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB); Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP); Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration Fund (PSAR); Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP); Pierce County Conservation Futures; Pierce County Transfer of Development Rights Program (TDR); Private Foundations; Floodplains by Design; and, other sources as applicable. 

Use the data dashboard below to learn more about FFTF Partner contributions. Click on the tabs "Investments" "Sources" "Projects" to answer questions such as:

Investments
How much have FFTF Partners invested in integrated floodplain management since 2013?
How much has been spent on capital projects?
How much has been spent on conservation easements?

Sources
How much money has FFTF received from the Floodplains by Design grant program?
How much has the Pierce County Flood Control Zone District contributed to FFTF capital projects?
How much money has been leveraged in Local Funds and Grants?
How much money has been leveraged in State Grants?
How much money has been leveraged in Federal Grants?
How much money has been generated from Local, Tribal, and State Partnerships?

Projects
Which projects have had the greatest investment?
What is the current level of investment for individual capital projects?

Explore the data

 

Floodplain restoration projects

What are the latest floodplain reconnection or restoration projects?

Pierce County Planning & Public Works manages an ongoing program of floodplain reconnection and restoration projects as identified in their Rivers Flood Hazard Management Plan. Other local jurisdictions (King County, City of Sumner, City of Puyallup, City of Orting) also plan and implement projects in the floodplain to meet local objectives. The number, status (in progress, planned, completed, etc.) and phase (acquisition, design, construction, etc.) of projects related to floodplain reconnection and/or restoration will be measured and tracked against the 2013 baseline to provide an indication of progress toward multiple FFTF goals.

See the Projects page for more information about individual projects.

FFTF GOAL(S): Reduce flood risk and damage to public infrastructure
Reconnect floodplain to the river (at various flow levels)
Provide more space for the river to migrate
Increase public access to floodplains
BASELINE YEAR: 2013 (First year of Floodplains by Design funding)
STATUS: TBD (Information still to be compiled and reviewed)
SOURCE(S): Pierce County Rivers Flood Hazard Management Plan & Flood Control Zone District Comprehensive plan of Development (2013); Project specific information provided by jurisdictions.

At-risk structures removed from flood risk

How many at-risk structures have been removed from flood risk?

Counties and cities in the Puyallup watershed regularly identify and seek to address risks to individual structures and properties from flood damage and harm. Properties include those identified in adopted flood management plans or repetitive loss plans. Governments reduce risks by physically removing the property or structure through acquisition or providing a structural solution (such as a levee setback). At-risk structures can also be abandoned after a flood event. This number of structures will be tracked and measured against the 2013 baseline as an indication of progress toward making communities more resilient to flooding and reducing the flood risk and damage on private properties.

FFTF GOAL(S): Make communities more resilient to flooding and reduce flood risk and damage to private property
Reduce flood risk and damage to public infrastructure
BASELINE YEAR: 2013 (First year of Floodplains by Design funding)
STATUS: None to report; baseline information to be established in 2018
SOURCE(S): Pierce County, King County, and Cities of Puyallup, Sumner, and Orting.  Existing plans include: Pierce County Rivers Flood Hazard Management Plan (2013); King County Flood Hazard Management Plan (2006) and Update (2013); and City of Puyallup Hazard Mitigation Plan Update (2017).

Conserved farmland

How many acres of farmland have been conserved?

The Strategic Conservation Partnership (SCP) is a collaborative group of local government, conservation district, and non-profits focused on projects that accelerate and improve the pace, quality, and durability of resource land conservation activities in Pierce County with a focus on agricultural lands. The SCP has set a ten-year voluntary conservation goal of 6,000 acres that includes the purchase of agricultural conservation easements or acquisition of land from willing sellers. The SCP will track progress toward this goal and report changes against the status in 2013 as an indication of progress toward prohibiting or limiting conversion of agricultural lands and protecting existing lands.

The SCP Shared Conservation Strategy Document can be viewed here.

FFTF GOAL(S): Protect/conserve agricultural lands
Prevent conversion of agricultural lands to non-ag uses
BASELINE YEAR: 2013 (First year of Floodplains by Design funding)
STATUS: TBD (Information still to be compiled and reviewed)
SOURCE(S): Shared Conservation Partnership 

Strategic Conservation Partnership properties

How many SCP properties have been conserved or converted into non-agricultural land uses?

The Strategic Conservation Partnership has identified the most suitable parcels for farmland conservation in Pierce County through a GIS-based analysis. The parcels share a variety of criteria (e.g., soils, size, ownership, zoning designation, and threat of conversion) and are the focus of landowner outreach to promote participation in conservation easements, acquisition, or estate planning. Changes in the status of these priority parcels will be tracked and measured against the status in 2013 as an indication of progress toward prohibiting or limiting conversion of agricultural lands and protecting existing lands.

The SCP Shared Conservation Strategy Document can be viewed here.

FFTF GOAL(S): Protect/conserve agricultural lands
Prevent conversion of agricultural lands to non-ag uses
BASELINE YEAR: 2013 (First year of Floodplains by Design funding)
STATUS: TBD (Information still to be compiled and reviewed)
SOURCE(S): Shared Conservation Partnership Conservation Funding Suitability Analysis

WRIA 10/12 Salmon Recovery Strategy actions

What are the latest salmon recovery actions affecting floodplains?

The WRIA 10/12 Lead Entity coordinates salmon recovery projects in Puyallup and Chambers/Clover watersheds. The Lead Entity has citizen and technical committees comprised of representatives of Pierce and King County, cities, towns, tribes, the conservation district, salmon enhancement organizations, non-profit organizations, citizens and state agency staff. Working together, they coordinate and apply for funds to build projects that improve salmon habitat in the Puyallup, Carbon and White rivers, as well as South Prairie, Boise, Chambers and Clover creeks and important tributaries in both watersheds.

Many projects also reduce flood hazards by removing flood prone houses and structures and building setback levees that create habitat and protect upland properties.The current Salmon Habitat Protection and Restoration Strategy helps guide the projects. The current projects and actions will be tracked and recorded from 2013 into the future to provide a measure of progress toward improving habitat quality for salmonids and salmon recovery goals.

WRIA 10/12 Lead Entity website: http://www.co.pierce.wa.us/2873/Salmon-Recovery---Lead-Entity

FFTF GOAL(S): Improve habitat quality and increase salmon abundance
Re-establish intertidal habitat in estuary
Reconnect floodplain to the river
Improve water quality
BASELINE YEAR: 2013 (First year of Floodplains by Design funding)
STATUS: TBD (Information still to be compiled and reviewed)
SOURCE(S): Habitat Work Schedule information maintained by Pierce County Lead Entity Coordinator with support from Planning & Public Works staff and project sponsors